jon montgomery

Jon Montgomery: From Olympic Gold to The Amazing Race Canada

The Amazing Race Canada is back with another season premiering on July 2. We spoke with host Jon Montgomery, who won a gold medal in men’s skeleton at the 2010 Olympic Games in Vancouver, about the new season and this month’s Paris Olympics.

How does it feel to be back for the 10th season?

Good gravy. Could you imagine this would be going on for 10 years? It’s awesome. You know what? It’s maybe sad to say for me, but honestly, I can’t wait to get back out there with what I consider to be my second family.

What keeps you coming back to The Amazing Race Canada?

They ask me. I will do this until the cows come home, to steal a prairie euphemism, as long as CTV wants me at the helm. And even after that, I’m gonna show up anyway. I’m like athlete’s foot — I keep coming back year after year.

What makes you most excited about the new season?

Well, it’s a milestone — season 10. The teams are awesome, great group of racers and challenges. And we’re landing in my hometown of Russell, Manitoba. Can you believe it? I can’t wait to show off my hometown.

What do you think makes The Amazing Race Canada click with audiences?

I think it resonates on a few different levels, but I think the primary resonance is that people can see themselves on the show. And you know, a guy like me who is a fan of it, I can’t see myself on other programs. I’ll never be on So You Think You Can Dance Canada with two left feet, and I couldn’t carry a tune in a bucket.

You try all the challenges as well. What have you found most difficult?

I didn’t really love heights to begin with, and so having to approach that fear [is difficult]. And you know you’re going to have to approach your fear of heights if you have one. Every single season on The Amazing Race, we’re always jumping off of something.

You provided this country with a very memorable Olympic moment yourself. What’s your fondest memory from that time?

Well, I would have to say being at my own event was very memorable. Once that’s done, you kind of switch gears into a bit more of a celebratory type of a mindset, and so sharing incredible moments with my brothers and sisters, celebrating our other athletes was profound.

What advice would you offer those athletes heading over to Paris?

Have some fun and get it done. The work that has got you to this point and is going to be required for you to be at your best on the day that matters most has already been done. You can’t will a victory. You just have to trust in the work that you’ve done, be present and in the moment.

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